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Newsroom
12/9/2012
First Pediatric Study to Look at the Role of Vitamin D
OTTAWA, Canada, September 12, 2012—Vitamin D is increasingly being recognized as
important for good health. Vitamin D is a hormone made in the skin following sun exposure or acquired from diet and supplement intake. Previous medical research has shown that low body levels of vitamin D make people more susceptible to problems such as bone fractures, poor mental health and infections like the common cold. Until recently, there had been little consideration given to the role of vitamin D in more severe diseases, which is why Dr. Dayre McNally’s recent publication in the esteemed scientific journal Pediatrics is so compelling.
“This is the first study to report on vitamin D levels in a large group of critically ill children,” said Dr. McNally, a clinical researcher and intensivist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa.
The study, led by Dr. McNally at the CHEO Research Institute, included over 300 children and teenagers at six hospitals in Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Edmonton, Saskatoon and Vancouver.These children were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe infections, significant trauma or conditions requiring major surgery, such as congenital heart defects.
 
Their study found that in three of every four critically ill children, blood vitamin D levels were below the target considered safe by many experts and medical societies. Further, those with lower vitamin D levels were noted to be sicker, requiring more life‐sustaining therapies (breathing tubes, medications to support heart function) and staying in the ICU for longer periods of time.
 
“Although these findings are of concern, we are very encouraged because we’ve discovered something that is modifiable,” explained Dr. McNally. “There are simple ways to prevent this problem, and it may be possible to rapidly restore vitamin D levels at the time of severe illness.”
This study was conducted by Dr. Dayre McNally, Dr. Kusum Menon, Dr. Pranesh Chakraborty, Lawrence Fisher, Kathryn Williams, Dr. Osama Al‐Dirbashi and Dr. Dermot Doherty. It was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the CHEO Research Institute.
About the CHEO Research Institute
Established in 1984, the CHEO Research Institute coordinates the research activities of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and is one of the institutes associated with the University of Ottawa Teaching Hospitals. The Research Institute brings together health professionals from within CHEO to share their efforts in solving pediatric health problems. It also promotes collaborative research outside the hospital with partners from the immediatecommunity, industry and the international scientific world. For more information, please visit
www.cheori.org.
 
About the University of Ottawa
The University of Ottawa is committed to research excellence and encourages an
interdisciplinary approach to knowledge creation, which attracts the best academic talent from across Canada and around the world. The University is an important stakeholder in the National Capital Region’s economic development.
Media contacts:
Adrienne Vienneau
CHEO Research Institute
Direct: 613‐737‐7600 (4144)
Cell: 613‐513‐8437
avienneau@cheo.on.ca
Karine Proulx
Media relations officer, University of Ottawa
Office: 613‐562‐5800 (3149)
Cell: 613‐219‐3058
karine.proulx@uOttawa.ca
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